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Centimetre to Metre Calculator

Centimetre to Metre Conversion

A centimetre (international spelling as used by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures; symbol cm) or centimeter (American spelling) is a unit of length in the metric system, equal to one hundredth of a metre, centi being the SI prefix for a factor of 1/100.[1] The centimetre was the base unit of length in the now deprecated centimetre–gram–second (CGS) system of units. Though for many physical quantities, SI prefixes for factors of 103—like milli- and kilo-—are often preferred by technicians, the centimetre remains a practical unit of length for many everyday measurements. A centimetre is approximately the width of the fingernail of an average adult person

PMOS logic, P-type metal-oxide-semiconductor logic

Here is the P-type metal-oxide-semiconductor logic uses p-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) to implement logic gates and other digital circuits. PMOS transistors operate by creating an inversion layer in an n-type transistor body. This inversion layer, called the p-channel, can conduct holes between p-type "source" and "drain" terminals.

What is Arduino?

Arduino is an open-source hardware and software company, project and user community that designs and manufactures single-board microcontrollers and microcontroller kits for building digital devices.

Electric current

An electric current is the rate of flow of electric charge past a point[1]:2[2]:622 or region.[2]:614 An electric current is said to exist when there is a net flow of electric charge through a region.[3]:832 In electric circuits this charge is often carried by electrons moving through a wire. It can also be carried by ions in an electrolyte, or by both ions and electrons such as in an ionized gas (plasma).[4] The SI unit of electric current is the ampere , which is the flow of electric charge across a surface at the rate of one coulomb per second. The ampere (symbol: A) is an SI base unit[5]:15 Electric current is measured using a device called an ammeter.

Volts, Electric potential energy

When a bunch of electrons congregate in one place, their combined charges build up to a certain level of electric potential energy in that object. For example, when I rub this rubber balloon on my wool scarf, it causes a bunch of the electrons from the scarf to jump over on the balloon. Now the balloon is negatively charged, because it has a surplus of negatively charged electrons, and the scarf is positively charged, because it has a shortage of electrons.